on newsstands Now!

eNewsletter Sign Up

Bookmark and Share

Memphis Moments

Blues on the Bluff

Moonlighting for a Cure

Cocktails for a Cause

Bourbon and Bows

Susan G. Komen Survivor Luncheon

Carpenter Art Garden

Salvation Army

It's a Wrap

Cemetery Cinema

RIP


Stories and Photos by Bill Bannister, Suzanne Thompson Cozza and Emily Adams Keplinger.

 
 

Blues on the Bluff

A Benefit for WEVL FM 89.9

The only thing hotter than the weather during Blues on the Bluff was the music. The sole fundraising event for radio station WEVL, FM 89.9, was held at the National Ornamental Metal Museum on a sizzling summer night. WEVL stands for “We Volunteer,” the call letters chosen in 1976 when the station was founded, because the disc jockeys are volunteers, according to Brian Craig, program director at WEVL. The station launched the annual musical event in 1989. Three local bands performed, with The MDs returning to the event and opening the show. First-time performers at the fundraiser were headliner Ghost Town Blues Band, which stopped in town during a U.S. tour, and Marcella & Her Lovers, whose sultry sounds closed out the show. “The music was great, and the crowd really enjoyed it,” says Craig. Central BBQ was on hand and Schafly Brewery was the beverage sponsor. The Peddler Bike Shop also sponsored the event.

 
 

Moonlighting for a Cure

In Support of St. Jude Children’s Hospital

It was a hot night on Beale as seven bands rocked the stage of the Tin Roof to raise money for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Moonlighting For A Cure got under way with The Mighty Electric St. Jude Band leading the pack. There was a standing room only crowd of music lovers and supporters who came out to do their part for St. Jude. Party-goers bought raffle tickets for treasures like a Moonlighting For a Cure electric guitar, a full-size classic Sun Records sign, plus an assortment of fine wine and art works by local artists. Up for bids on the silent auction table were one-of-a-kind goodies from The Memphis Grizzlies, Hollywood Feed, Wiseacre Brewery, and Bluff City Escape Rooms. Sponsors included Regions Bank, Hog And Hominy, Mulan Asian Bistro, Radio Memphis, and Sheffield Antiques Mall. WMC TV5’s Ron Childers was the celebrity emcee. 

     
 

Cocktails for a Cause

Raising Funds for Restore Corps

A crowd gathered poolside at the Central Gardens home of Kathy and Kelly Fish for their “Cocktails for a Cause.” More than a social event, the party had a purpose — raising money for a local nonprofit organization. Restore Corps, a program of Memphis Leadership Foundation, was the beneficiary of this event. Kathy invited friends to stop by and have a cocktail or two, and to make a donation to the featured organization. She also asked the organization to invite their supporters, and to secure a donor who provided matching funds. Matt Haagan of State Farm Insurance joined an anonymous donor to provide matching funds of over $4,000. “Restore Corps works to empower survivors, as well as equip communities, to change the system with regard to human trafficking and sex slavery in Tennessee,” explained Rachel Haagan, executive director of Restore Corps. “Cocktails for a Cause was started to celebrate and raise awareness for all the great work being done by nonprofit organizations by dedicated passionate Memphians,” said Kathy. “The outpouring of support for the Restore Corps was no exception. It was a great evening.” 

     
 

Bourbon and Bows

Supporting Business Travel Scholarships

A stunning view of east Memphis from the top of the Crescent Center provided the backdrop for Bourbon and Bows, hosted by the Business Travel Association to benefit scholarships to further knowledge of business travel. Over 100 attendees from travel industry suppliers, corporations, Memphis Shelby County Airport, Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau and a host of local and national sponsors were on hand. Guests sampled fine bourbons like Larceny, Contradiction, Elijah Craig, and Old Grand Dad. Chef Stanley of the Crescent Club served up Purple Hull Pea Fritters, Chicken with Bourbon Sauce, Fried Green Tomatoes, Blackeyed Pea Salsa, Shrimp and Grits, and Bread Pudding. Bowties were provided by Courtenay Elliott of Doggone Bowties. Patti Shaw made bowtie covered Oreo cookies and brownies. Music was from the Po Boys, and Chris Jarman from 98.1 The Max was special celebrity emcee.

     
 

Susan G. Komen Survivor Luncheon

25th Anniversary Celebration

Approximately 350 people gathered at the Holiday Inn - University of Memphis as the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure Memphis-MidSouth Affiliate hosted its annual Survivor Luncheon. Cancer survivors and Race for the Cure sponsors were there to support one another and celebrate the organization’s 25th anniversary and the advancements being made in the fight against breast cancer. Pat McRee was the 2017 Honorary Survivor Race Chair. WREG News Channel 3 anchors Stephanie Scurlock and Greg Hurst served as emcees. Sheri Y. Prentiss, MD, was the keynote speaker and Kenny Lackey provided music and entertainment for the luncheon. “We are so honored to have served our community since 1993,” said Elaine Hare, Chief Executive Officer of Susan G. Komen Memphis-MidSouth. “The original group of ladies who gathered around that now famous kitchen table had no idea that by 2017 the Race for the Cure would generate over $10.5 million in community grants for the Mid-South, and over $3 million in funds for breast cancer research. The more money we raise, the more lives that are saved.”

 
     
 

Carpenter Art Garden

5th Anniversary Celebration

Carpenter Art Gardens celebrated its 5th anniversary at its annual art show. It was the first time the show was held on one of the six formerly blighted properties it has purchased on Carpenter Street since its launch in 2012, said founder Erin Harris. She believes cleaning up blighted properties on the street, and using art to beautify them improved the lives of its residents, particularly children who walk to and from school on Carpenter Street. “Some rough things were going on there on the street,” Harris says. The group operates art programs for the neighborhood children, and turned two of the properties into community gardens. In 2013, architecture students from the University of Memphis began partnering with the group to build things like a learning pavilion, a hammock and outdoor painting station, and the traveling vegetable cart used to sell produce grown in one of the community gardens.

     
 

Salvation Army

Playing for a Purpose

As The Salvation Army Women’s Auxiliary hosted its annual Game Day, a crowd gathered at The Kroc Center for a day of fun. The event, formerly known as Bridge and More, has enjoyed a strong following for over 20 years. “As interest in Mah Jongg has increased, we changed the name to ‘Game Day’ to have a broader appeal,” said Mary Ellen Chase, event chairman. “And to accommodate those who wanted to play, but didn’t know how, we offered classes for bridge, taught by Milner Stanton, and Janie Morris and Betty Lyon taught Mah Jongg.” Others showed their support by making early purchases of the organization’s 2017 Christmas card, “Giving with the Heart of a Child,” which celebrates The Salvation Army’s work with children. The card features artwork by artist Dr. Tim Hacker of Memphis. But regardless of whether they came to learn, to play or even just to join the camaraderie during lunch, all were part of raising funds to support the ministries run by The Salvation Army.

 

 

It's a Wrap

Celebrating The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

It was the last chance to see “Unwrapped! 100 Gifts for 100 Years,” an exhibition that served as a centerpiece for the centennial celebration of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. While classical guitarist Ben Minden-Birkenmaier provided musical entertainment, guests enjoyed cocktails and appetizers as they viewed the diverse art on display. The exhibition not only celebrated the museum’s first century, but also served to emphasize the importance of building a collection. “Over 275 members, artists and patrons, all supporters of the arts, came to our ‘It’s a Wrap’ closing party,” said Dr. Emily Ballew Neff, Executive Director of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. “Some of the items curated will remain at The Brooks, and some items, those that are promised gifts, will return to their current homes.” “Ranging from ancient coins to contemporary glass, from paintings to quilts, the exhibition displayed all of these gifts in glorious profusion,” explained Karen Davis, Public Relations Specialist for The Brooks. “Our goal was to acquire superlative objects for The Brooks’ permanent collection, and build on the strengths across the museum’s holdings.” 

 

Cemetery Cinema

An Evening of Outdoor Film

Elmwood Cemetery is one of Memphis’ most amazing places, where you are literally surrounded by history. On a perfect early autumn evening, more than 300 Elmwood supporters turned out to enjoy an outdoor screening of Mel Brooks’ “Young Frankenstein”, as part of a fundraising series of films called Cemetery Cinema. Guests were invited to bring their own chairs and coolers for the movie, and the La Guadalupana food truck was on hand with their huge assortment of mouth-watering authentic Mexican delights. Movie goers lined up for popcorn and MemPops before settling in to watch a presentation of 1950s television commercials produced by Willy Bearden for Propaganda TV before the main feature. Cemetery Cinema is without a doubt the most fun date night in town.

     
 

RIP

A Season of Mourning

As the Rest In Peace exhibit opened at the historic Woodruff-Fontaine House, guests were ushered into a Victorian-style season of mourning with an “evening with the spirits.” Mannequins attired in fashions and accessories from the museum’s mourning collection gave silent testimony to the solemn etiquette and symbolism. Carter Jackson, Funeral Director with Memphis Funeral Home, gave a presentation about the Undertaking profession and its protocol during the Victorian era. Memphis collector Harmony Carrigan displayed her Memento Mori collection of funeralia and post mortem photography.“We go into mourning to coincide with the timing of the Yellow Fever epidemic of 1878,” explained Jennifer Cooper, Executive Director of the Woodruff-Fontaine house museum. “The Rest In Peace exhibit will remain on display through the end of October.”